Prominent Voices Rise Against Site C

The latest headlines: more than 350 NDP volunteers and trade union members signed an open letter calling for the end of Site C; a coalition of 14 First Nations and Metis communities in Alberta and the Northwest Territories also sent an open letter to the BC government urging it to cancel the project; Harry Swain, who chaired the federal-provincial review panel on Site C in 2013-14, details some of the forgotten, damaging costs of the project. 


Prominent NDP Members, NDP Volunteers and Trade Unionists Sign Open Letter to the Premier Urging Site C Cancellation

http://www.marketwired.com/press-release/prominent-ndp-members-ndp-volunteers-trade-unionists-sign-open-letter-premier-urging-2242383.htm

The NDP government is days away from making their decision regarding whether or not to complete or kill Site C, a decision which will have implications for BC's economic, social and environmental future. As it remains unclear which way the NDP government is currently leaning, supporters want to ensure the government they voted for is clear on their expectations as long-time, dedicated NDP organizers and union members.


Indigenous groups in Alberta, N.W.T. say they've borne 'enormous costs' from B.C. dams, call for end to Site C

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/site-c-mackenzie-basin-delta-indigenous-communities-1.4427481

A coalition of 14 First Nations and Metis communities in Alberta and the Northwest Territories called on B.C. Premier John Horgan to cancel the Site C dam on the same day provincial cabinet ministers consulted with energy experts to help decide the fate of the controversial project.


he Forgotten Costs of Site C

http://www.timescolonist.com/opinion/op-ed/comment-the-forgotten-costs-of-the-site-c-dam-project-1.23108854

The press has been full of the debate about the Site C dam lately. Its great cost, its lack of markets, its consequences for the environment (at least a dozen serious, irreversible impacts, more than enough to have doomed any other project), the costs to ratepayers and job-seekers, have all commanded media attention, and properly so. Two issues have received much less attention, however.